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dc.contributor.authorISSAAD, Cynda
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-03T07:43:04Z
dc.date.available2019-07-03T07:43:04Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationMedia and Cultural Studiesen
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.ummto.dz/dspace/handle/ummto/5131
dc.description53p.;30cm.(+cd)en
dc.description.abstractThe present research paper was a comparison of John Millington Synge’s Riders to the Sea (1904), Derek Walcott’s The Sea at Dauphin (1945), and Athol Fugard’s The Island (1973). These three plays portrayed how islands resist colonial domination and influence even at the end of colonization. To treat this subject, I opted for Bill Aschcroft, Gareth Grifiths, and Helen Tiffin “The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-colonial Literature”(2002). My choice of this book results from the fact that the three playwrights depicted how the natives resisted the colonial oppression through language and identity in a prison like island. This work was divided into three sections, the first one explored how language was used as a means of resistance, while the second dealt with the image of the prison like island. The third tackled the issue of identity crisis in these islands.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMouloud Mammeri University of Tizi-Ouzouen
dc.titleJohn Millington Synge’s Riders to the Sea (1904), Derek Walcott’s The Sea at Dauphin (1954), and Athol Fugard’s The Island (1973): A Postcolonial study.en
dc.typeThesisen


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