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dc.contributor.authorDJEMILI, Djamel
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-03T08:02:41Z
dc.date.available2019-07-03T08:02:41Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationMedia Studiesen
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.ummto.dz/dspace/handle/ummto/5136
dc.description53p.;30cm.(+cd)en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the issue of the New Woman in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure and Grant Allen’s novel The Woman who did, both first published in 1895. The intended purpose of this study is to put into implementation Frederic Jameson’s theory The Political Unconscious that is explored in his theoretical book entitled The Political Unconscious: Literature as a Socially Symbolic Act (1981). Our discussion shows how the Victorian Institution of Marriage, and Religion were harsh on the lives of the British people particularly women. We have demonstrated that a group called New Women emerged to oppose those imposed ideals. This group came into existence in order to gain their rights in all domains. Sue Bridehead in Thomas Hardy’s novel Jude the Obscure and Herminia Barton in Grant Allen’s the Woman who did are chosen to be New Women heroines whose attitudes towards marriage, education and religion seem to be in opposition. Accordingly, this work has shown that Thomas Hardy’sJude the Obscure and Grant Allen’s the Woman Who did are socially symbolic acts.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMouloud Mammeri University of Tizi-Ouzouen
dc.titleThe Representation of the ‘New Woman’ in Late Victorian Fiction: the Case of Grant Allen’s The Woman who did (1895) and Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure (1895)en
dc.typeThesisen


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